Thursday, January 9, 2014

Question of the Week: You've shipwrecked! What 3 books do you want stranded with you?

Oh no! You've unexpectedly shipwrecked on an island and you have no idea when, or if, you'll be rescued. Whatever are you going to do with the rest of your days (after creating a shelter and finding water and food)? You'll read, of course! Your carry-on has conveniently washed ashore, and it contains the 3 books you brought with you. What 3 books you would want to be stranded with?

Here are my three books -

The Blue Sword - Robin McKinley
This is one of my all-time favorite books...

Harry Crewe is an orphan girl who comes to live in Damar, the desert country shared by the Homelanders and the secretive, magical Hillfolk. Her life is quiet and ordinary-until the night she is kidnapped by Corlath, the Hillfolk King, who takes her deep into the desert. She does not know the Hillfolk language; she does not know why she has been chosen. But Corlath does. Harry is to be trained in the arts of war until she is a match for any of his men. Does she have the courage to accept her true fate?



Open Season - Linda Howard
The technology in this one is a bit out of date, but it features a librarian taking charge of her life...

Daisy Minor is a small-town librarian tired of being a good girl, living with her widowed mother and spinster aunt. She wants to experience life and love, to have some fun. She sets out to reinvent, or at least redecorate, herself. She seeks out a new look to match her new attitude, moves into her own place, and sets out in search of all the fun and adventure she's been missing. Soon she's dancing her nights away, flirting with men, and thoroughly enjoying her new free-spirited lifestyle. Then, late one night, she sees something that no one was supposed to see and finds herself in deadly danger. Suddenly, a killer declares it's Open Season on Daisy Minor, and Daisy's one hope, for life and love, is to find the perfect man to save her life -- and share it.

Styxx - Sherrilyn Kenyon
The latest in the Dark Hunters series, I'd be really sad if I never got the chance to read it again. It was that good.

Centuries ago Acheron saved the human race by imprisoning an ancient evil bent on absolute destruction. Now that evil has been unleashed and it is out for revenge. As the twin to Acheron, Styxx hasn't always been on his brother's side. They've spent more centuries going at each other's throats than protecting their backs. Now Styxx has a chance to prove his loyalty to his brother, but only if he's willing to trade his life and future for Acheron's. The Atlantean goddess of Wrath and Misery, Bethany was born to right wrongs. But it was never a task she relished. Until now. She owes Acheron a debt that she vows to repay, no matter what it takes. But things are never what they seem, and now Styxx and Acheron must put aside their past and learn to trust each other or more will suffer. Yet it's hard to risk your own life for someone who once tried to take yours, even when it's your own twin...

4 comments:

Bookish One said...

Well, since we're talking shipwreck and longterm isolation, I am going with series. The three series I'd like to take with me areL

Ngiao Marsh's Inspector Alleyn mysteries. They are cozy with a hint on ugly human nature. Classic a la Christie. Alleyn's relationship with his artist wife is a thing of British stiff-upper-lip beauty.

Elizabeth Peters' Emerson Peabody series. death by mummy, drawing room farce, and family problems the likes of which no one has ever seen ("Ramses, get out of that tomb at once."), these are funny, historically interesting, and ripping yarns.

Louise Penny's Inspector Gamache series. Gamache is an extraordinary man who is uncommonly good at policing and helping others to reach their potential. He solves a few mean-spirited crimes along the way. Not quite cozy, not quite police procedural, not quite thriller. 100% intriguing! Her characters grow with each entry.

Terry said...

Not an easy question. I think that I would start with Nevil Shute's A Town Like Alice , which always gives me comfort when I feel that humanity has forgot what it should be.

Next, William Manchester's The Glory and The Dream , which is non-fiction and covers the period from 1932-1972 in the U.S. It helped me understand my parents and why certain things were so important to them. Manchester was such a wonderful writer!

Finally, Sue Townsend's The Queen and I because after being shipwrecked, I think that I would need some humor and this is still one of the funniest books I have ever read.

Joyous Lizard said...

I'd want dense prose to keep me occupied. Moby Dick for sure. Jitterbug Perfume (really, any Tom Robbins) to keep my mind blown on a regular basis. Poetry to keep the muse entertained. Got to be Leaves of Grass. Walt Whitman would keep my desire for connection to the cosmos well fueled.

Diane said...

The first book would be:
Practical Outdoor Survival: A Modern Approach
by Len McDougall

The second book would be:
The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

The third book would be:
Dorothy And The Wizard In Oz
by Lyman Frank Baum